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Submitted on
September 10, 2010
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:iconthezachadoodle:
TheZachadoodle Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2012
@01:28What machine was used to give the sound? I would really like to know :D
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:iconskeleton-boy:
Skeleton-Boy Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2012  Professional General Artist
@00:37The tune is called "powerhouse" and it was composed by Raymond Scott in 1937.
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:iconmoso-stuff:
Moso-stuff Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2010  Student General Artist
@00:25Chuck Norris! XD
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-Or-
"Amadeus on a Steenbeck"

My fourth 16 mm film for Sight and Sound: Film in the Kanbar institute of film and television of the Tisch school of the arts at NYU.

I love working with media that's hand-made, and so I wanted to pay tribute to the Steenbeck flatbed editing machine, which is sadly falling out of use as digital editing becomes the norm. The film was shot on an Arri-S 16 millimeter camera with kodak film and cut by hand on a Steenbeck. I took sound effects from the Steenbeck room and cobbled them together into a version of Raymond Scott's classic jazz composition "Powerhouse." (With the help of Daniel LaCosse, of course). The music was recorded onto magnetic tape and synced on the Steenbeck. All the while, I felt like I was channeling a media pioneer from the 30s or something.

I wanted to show a character playing a Steenbeck like a musical instrument. I chose to use Raymond Scott's "Powerhouse" (1937) because it has become famous as the "assembly-line song" from Warner Bros. Cartoons. A Steenbeck reminds me of factory equipment (in a film factory), the WB cartoons are significant to media history, and the song itself is a significant formalist achievement.

Raymond Scott was an innovator of recorded and electronic music in the 20th century. His music was as handmade as an early sound movie. Here is a little documentary about Raymond Scott and his genius

As Raymond Scott observed, "Putting notes together, [putting ART together,] is fun!"

---
Dec. 30: Thank you, deviantART community, Especially `ArtisnotanAccident, for choosing to make my 16 mm film "The Film Factory" a daily deviation!

Meanwhile, if you like "The Film Factory" please take some time to look through the rest of my gallery, and please get in touch with me!
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Daily Deviation

Given 2010-12-30
The super 8 film sets the tone perfectly in The Film Factory by *Skeleton-Boy. A must for any film collector. ( Featured by ArtisnotanAccident )
:iconbittersweet-ink:
bittersweet-ink Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
I love this! the music made me smile :)
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:iconthezachadoodle:
TheZachadoodle Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2012
@01:28I like 16mm film and I wonder did you put in the music after the film or on the film? I'm trying to know how to do it. Plus do you know where I can find 16mm film cheaply?
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:iconskeleton-boy:
Skeleton-Boy Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
@01:28The sound track was separate from the film track.

I found the music first, and listened to the song on my ipod with headphones while filming to make sure I got the tempo right, and then synced them together after.

My friend and I cobbled the music and sound effects together in something like Protools or Garageband. Then we exported the mp3 to a cd and used this large machine that belonged to the school to transfer the song onto a reel of magnetic tape or "mag strip." Then the sound reel and picture reel were synced up on the flatbed editor seen in the video, so that when projected they would play at the same time.

That's a convoluted process and it was part of the lesson. It's a lot easier to just do the soundtrack on the computer and edit the footage digitally.
To bring the video to the internet I had my silent picture reel scanned professionally and then I synced the silent video up with the original mp3 on my computer.

Generally speaking, sound isn't recorded "on the film" like is is with digital video. Some old film stocks used to have built-in magnetic stripes for recording sound while filming, but they don't make that kind of film anymore.

As for finding some... I got my film from my school as part of the class, so I'm not 100% sure where to get the best deal on it. BUT if you can't find any at your local camera equipment store and are serious about getting some, you can order some rolls online from B&H photo, a large camera store in New York (1 roll would cost about 30 dollars) (go here:[link] )

I hope you found this helpful. Thanks for commenting :)
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:iconthezachadoodle:
TheZachadoodle Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2012
@01:28What machine was used to give the sound? I would really like to know :D
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:iconlodcronoz:
LoDCronoZ Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
@00:37what is the name of this song ????
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:iconskeleton-boy:
Skeleton-Boy Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2012  Professional General Artist
@00:37The tune is called "powerhouse" and it was composed by Raymond Scott in 1937.
Reply
:iconvorelove315:
vorelove315 Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2010
@01:28FUCKING AWESOME]
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:icondoawin:
DoaWin Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2010  Student General Artist
@01:28o.o I have a bolex. Do you know where to oder flim?
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:iconskeleton-boy:
Skeleton-Boy Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2010  Professional General Artist
@01:28hmmm. IDK man, I got my film from my school. I'm sorry.

What kind of film does it take? You might be able to find some on the kodak site. They discontinued plus-x though.
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:icondoawin:
DoaWin Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2010  Student General Artist
@01:2816mm. Thanks ^^.
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